Glycemic Index

glycemic index for fat loss

If you’re eating right—filling your plate with organic salad greens and colorful veggies, accompanied by grass-fed meats, wild fish and raw nuts and seeds—then you’re already eating low on the glycemic index.

Congratulations!

For those of you new to this healthy way of eating, you’ll soon find it’s a simple and effective way to lose weight, reduce cravings, increase energy levels, boost mood, quell inflammation, balance hormones and protect against chronic disease.

The Glycemic Index: How Foods Affect Blood Sugar

The glycemic index is based on one simple concept: how a food impacts your blood sugar.

You may remember when carbohydrates were primarily classified into two groups: simple and complex.

bread glycemic index

Think whole grain bread is a healthy choice? Think again.

Simple carbohydrates included sugars—like fruit sugar (fructose), corn or grape sugar (dextrose and glucose) and table sugar (sucrose). Complex carbohydrates included anything made up of three of more linked sugars.

Conventional advice told us that complex carbs were “good”, and simple carbs were “bad”.

And while we knew that ALL carbohydrates get broken down into single sugar molecules which are then absorbed by the bloodstream and used as energy, we didn’t know the rate at which this happens.

Enter the glycemic index.

This system, developed by Dr. Janine Brand-Miller at the University of Sydney and popularized by Harvard doctors, including Dr. Walter Willett, rates foods according to how fast and how high they push blood sugar.

With the glycemic index, we’ve learned that all carbs are not created equal. We’ve also learned that “conventional” advice that complex carbohydrates are better than simple carbohydrates was an oversimplification (and flat-out false!).

In fact grain-based complex carbs – like whole wheat bread – can raise blood sugar levels MORE than a spoonful of table sugar!

And that’s really important to know because following a low glycemic diet is essential to preventing disease and staying healthy long into your golden years.

Benefits of The Glycemic Index: Go LOW for a Longer, Healthier Life

Following a low glycemic diet can help you:

How We Use the Glycemic Index

Think following a low GI diet is complicated? Healing Gourmet is here to help.

In fact, ALL of the recipes and menus you’ll find on this website are naturally low on the glycemic index. That’s because we:

  • Avoid grains, including all gluten grains – and instead create delicious, low glycemic breads and baked goods using coconut flour and other low glycemic nut flours (check out our healthy baking section and be sure to try some of our healthy desserts)
  • Avoid added sugar – instead opting to lightly sweeten with all-natural, zero glycemic erythritol and stevia
  • Avoid artificial sweeteners – like sucralose that can raise blood sugar, A1C and promote weight gain
  • Balance carbohydrate-rich foods with healthy fats (especially monounsaturated fats) to drive the glycemic response down

The Glycemic Index Table

Food List

Glycemic Index

(White Bread)

Glycemic Index

(Glucose Based)

 Glycemic Load

(Per Serving)

BAKERY PRODUCTS
Cake, sponge 66 46 17
Cake, banana, made with sugar 67 47 18
Cake, pound 77 54 15
Cake, banana, made without sugar 79 55 16
Pastry 84 59 15
Muffins, blueberry 84 59 17
Pizza, cheese 86 60 16
Cake, flan 93 65 31
Cake, angel food 95 67 19
Croissant 96 67 17
Pancakes 96 67 39
Crumpet 98 69 13
Donut 108 76 17
Waffles 109 76 10
Scones 131 92 7
Corn muffin, high amylose 146 102 30
BEVERAGES
Soy milk, full fat 63 44 8
Cordial, orange 94 66 13
Soft drink, Fanta 97 68 23
Gatorade 111 78 12
Lucozade 136 95 40
BREADS
Ezekiel 4:9 Sprouting Grain Bread 36 ?
Bürgen Oat Bran & Honey Loaf 43 30 3
Bürgen Mixed Grain 48 34
Barley kernel bread (coarse) 48 34
Multi-grain bread 61 43 6
Oat bran bread 68 48 9
Pumpernickel 71 50  –
Bulger bread 75 53 11
Cracked wheat kernel bread 76 53 11
Linseed rye bread 78 55 7
Pita bread, white 82 57 10
Hamburger bun 87 61 9
Semolina bread 92 64  –
Oat kernel bread 93 65 12
Barley flour bread 95 67 13
White bread, high fiber 96 67  –
Melba toast 100 70 16
Wheat bread, white 101 71 10
Bagel, white 103 72 25
Gluten free fiber enriched 104 73 9
Kaiser rolls 104 73 12
Whole-wheat snack bread 105 74 16
Bread stuffing 106 74 16
English muffin 109 77 11
Wheat bread, Wonderwhite 114 80 11
French baguette 136 95 15
BREAKFAST CEREALS
Rice Bran 27 19 3
Kelloggs All Bran 42 60
Kelloggs’ All Bran Fruit ‘n Oats 55 39 7
Kelloggs’ Guardian 59 41 5
Porridge (made from rolled oats) 70 49 13
Bran Buds 75 53 7
Special K 77 54 14
Ota bran 78 55 11
Muesli 80 56 9
Kelloggs’ Mini-Wheats (whole wheat) 83 58 12
Bran Chex 83 58 11
Kelloggs’ Just Right 84 59 13
Quick Oats 94 66 17
Instant Oats 94 66 17
Life 94 66 15
Nutri-grain 94 66 10
Cream of Wheat 94 66 17
Puffed Wheat 105 74
Bran Flakes 106 74 13
Cheerios 106 74 15
Shredded wheat 107 75 15
Corn Bran 107 75 15
Total 109 76 17
Cocopops 110 77 20
Post Grapenut Flakes 114 80 17
Rice Krispies 117 82 22
Corn Chex 118 83 21
Cornflakes 119 83 21
Crispix 124 87 22
Rice Chex 127 89 23
CEREAL GRAINS
Barley, pearled 36 25 11
Rye, whole kernels 48 34 13
Rice, long grain, boiled 5 minutes 58 41 16
Wheat kernels 59 41 14
Bulgur 68 48 12
Rice, parboiled (Canada) 68 48 18
Rice, parboiled, high amylose 50 35 14
Barley, cracked 72 50 21
Rice, long grain + wild rice (Uncle Ben’s) 77 54 20
Rice, brown 79 55 18
Rice, wild, Saskatchewan 81 57 18
Rice, white 91 64 23
Basmati rice, white, high amylose 83 58 22
Couscous 93 65 23
Barley, rolled 94 66 25
Taco shells 97 68 8
Cornmeal 98 69 9
Millet 101 71 25
Tapioca, boiled with milk 115 81 14
Rice, white, low amylose 126 88 38
Rice, instant, boiled 6 min 128 90 36
Amaranth 139 97 21
COOKIES
Oatmeal cookies 79 55 9
Rich Tea cookies 79 55 10
Shredded Wheatmeal 89 62 11
Shortbread 91 64 10
Graham Wafers 106 74 14
Vanilla Wafers 110 77 14
CRACKERS
Jatz 79 55 10
Ryvita High Fiber Rye Crispread 91 64 9
Breton Wheat Crackers 96 67 10
Stoned Wheat Thins 96 67 12
Sao 100 70 12
Kavli Norwegian Crispbread 101 71 12
Water Crackers 102 71 13
Rice Cakes 110 77 17
Puffed Crispbread 116 81 15
DAIRY FOODS
Fermented Cow’s Milk (Kefir, Langfil) 15 11
Milk, full fat 39 27 3
Milk, skim 46 32 4
Ice cream, premium 54 38 3
Yogurt 51 36 3
Ice cream, low fat 71 50 3
Ice cream, regular 87 61 8
FRUIT AND FRUIT PRODUCTS
Cherries 32 22 3
Grapefruit 36 25 3
Apricots, dried 43 30 8
Pear, fresh 53 38 4
Apple 54 38 6
Plum 55 39 5
Apple juice 57 40 12
Peach, fresh 60 42 5
Orange 63 44 5
Pear, canned 63 44 5
Grapes 66 46 8
Pineapple juice 66 46 15
Peach, canned 67 47 4
Grapefruit juice, unsweetened 69 48 11
Orange juice 74 52 13
Kiwifruit 75 53 6
Banana 77 54 12
Fruit cocktail 79 55 9
Mango 80 56 8
Apricots, fresh 82 57 5
Pawpaw 83 58 10
Figs, dried 87 64 16
Raisins 91 64 28
Cantaloupe 93 65 4
Pineapple 94 66 7
Watermelon 103 72 4
Dates 147 103 42
LEGUMES & NUTS
Soya beans, canned 20 14 1
Soya beans 25 18 1
Black beans, soaked, cooked 45 minutes 28 20 5
Lentils, red 36 25 5
Kidney beans, boiled 39 28 7
Chickpeas 39 28 8
Lentils, not specified 41 29 5
Lentils, green 42 29 5
Butter beans 44 31 6
Split peas, yellow, boiled 45 32 6
Lima beans, baby, frozen 46 32 10
Haricot/navy beans 54 38 12
Pinto beans 55 39 10
Chick peas, curry, canned 58 41 7
Black-eyed beans 59 41 13
Pinto beans, canned 64 45 10
Romano beans 65 46 8
Baked beans, canned 69 48 7
Kidney beans, canned 74 52 9
Lentils, green, canned 74 52 9
PASTA
Spaghetti, protein enriched 38 27 14
Fettuccine, egg 46 32 15
Mung bean noodles 47 33
Vermicelli 50 35 16
Spaghetti, wholemeal 53 37 16
Star pastina 54 38 18
Spaghetti, white, boiled 5 min 54 38 18
Ravioli, durum, meat filled 56 39 15
Spirali, durum 61 43 19
Spaghetti, white, boiled 10-15 min 64 44 21
Capellini (Angel Hair) 64 45 20
Linguine 65 46 22
Macaroni 67 47 23
Instant noodles 67 47 19
Tortellini, cheese 71 50 10
Macaroni and Cheese 92 64 32
Gnocchi 95 67 33
Rice pasta, brown 131 92 35
ROOT VEGETABLES
Yam 53 37 13
Sweet potato (Canada) 69 48 16
Potato, new 81 57 12
Potato, Prince Edward Island, boiled 90 63 11
Beets 91 64 5
Potato, steamed, peeled 93 65 18
Carrots, cooked 68 47 3
Swede (rutabaga) 103 72 7
Potato, boiled, mashed 105 74 15
Potato, microwaved 117 82 27
Potato, instant 118 83 17
Potato, baked (Russet) 121 85 26
Parsnips 139 97 12
SNACK FOOD AND CONFECTIONARY
Peanuts 21 15  1
Chocolate, milk 70 49 14
Potato chips 77 54 11
Popcorn 79 55 8
Corn chips 105 74 17
Jelly beans 114 80 22
Pretzels 116 81 16
SOUPS
Tomato soup 54 38 6
Minestrone 56 39 7
Lentil soup, canned 63 44 9
Split pea soup 86 60 12
Black bean soup 92 64 17
Green pea soup, canned 94 66 27
SUGARS & SUGAR ALCOHOLS
Erythritol 0 0 0
Xylitol 11 8 1
Agave nectar, light 97% fructose 14 10 1
Fructose 32 22 2
Lactose 65 46 5
Honey 83 58 10
High fructose corn syrup 89 62
Sucrose 92 64 7
Glucose 137 96
Glucose tablets 146 102
Maltose 150 105 11
VEGETABLES
Peas, green 68 48 3
Sweet corn 78 55 9
Pumpkin 107 75 3
Reference: International table of glycemic index and glycemic load 2002.
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References 
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About The Author

Kelley Herring, founder of Healing Gourmet, is a natural nutrition enthusiast with a background in biochemistry. Her passion is educating on how foods promote health and protect against disease and creating simple and delicious recipes for vibrant health and enjoyment.

Kelley Herring – who has written posts on Healing Gourmet.


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