Gluconeogenesis is the process by which glucose is created from non-carbohydrate carbon substrates such as pyruvate, lactate, glycerol, and glucogenic amino acids.

The vast majority of gluconeogenesis takes place in the liver and, to a smaller extent, in the cortex of kidneys. This process occurs during periods of fasting, starvation, or intense exercise and is highly endergonic (energy absorbing). Gluconeogenesis is often associated with ketosis.

Gluconeogenesis is also a target of therapy for type II diabetes, such as metformin, which inhibit glucose formation and stimulate glucose uptake by cells.

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Hundal R, Krssak M, Dufour S, Laurent D, Lebon V, Chandramouli V, Inzucchi S, Schumann W, Petersen K, Landau B, Shulman G (2000). "Mechanism by which metformin reduces glucose production in type 2 diabetes". Diabetes 49 (12): 2063–9. doi:10.2337/diabetes.49.12.2063. PMID 11118008. Free full textPDF (82 KiB)

About The Author

Kelley Herring, founder of Healing Gourmet, is a natural nutrition enthusiast with a background in biochemistry. Her passion is educating on how foods promote health and protect against disease and creating simple and delicious recipes for vibrant health and enjoyment.

Kelley Herring – who has written posts on Healing Gourmet.

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