cherries reduce inflammation

Cherries Reduce Inflammation by 25%!

by Kelley Herring on December 6, 2012

Inflammation is (or should be) a serious concern. It is the cornerstone of cellular aging and the root of chronic disease, which now affects more than 100 million people in the U.S. alone.

But new research shows that eating many of your favorite foods, including cherries, may help quell inflammation and forestall the ravages of aging.

Cherries Reduce Inflammation, Boost Antioxidants and More

A recent study published in the Journal of Nutrition evaluated the effect of cherries on inflammation. Eighteen healthy men and women supplemented their diets with bing cherries (280 grams/day, or just less than two cups of pitted cherries) for 28 days. Blood samples were drawn and analyzed before and during the cherry noshing, as well as 28 days afterward.

After 28 days, the subjects’ plasma concentrations of c-reactive protein (CRP), a primary marker of inflammation, decreased by 25%. Then, after the subjects abstained from cherries for 28 days, their circulating concentrations of CRP increased by approximately 10%.

Choosing The Best Cherries

Choose cherries for a sweet treat with real health benefits. Whirl frozen organic cherries (try Cascadian Farm Organic Cherries) into a protein smoothie or enjoy with an ounce of dark chocolate for an antioxidant-rich treat that will help keep inflammation at bay.

 

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About The Author

Kelley Herring, founder of Healing Gourmet, is a natural nutrition enthusiast with a background in biochemistry. Her passion is educating on how foods promote health and protect against disease and creating simple and delicious recipes for vibrant health and enjoyment.

Kelley Herring – who has written posts on Healing Gourmet.


References 
Darshan S. Kelley, Reuven Rasooly, Robert A. Jacob, Adel A. Kader, and Bruce E. Mackey Consumption of Bing Sweet Cherries Lowers Circulating Concentrations of Inflammation Markers in Healthy Men and Women J. Nutr. April 2006 136: 4 981-986

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